You are here

Let’s start a ‘99% Movement’

Published: 
Wednesday, August 9, 2017

In America, the wealthiest income groups are the Asians and the Jews. They have amassed their wealth by supporting each other and circulating the income they generate within their communities.

They buy from shops owned by members of their community and use the services provided by members of their respective communities.

If they own shopping malls, they give the best spots to their own and charge them a lower rent than other tenants.

Those outside their communities that want to open stores, are forced to use their designers and their tradespeople, pay their exorbitant charges and accept their crappy work, without complaint.

When they hire a security firm, doctors, lawyers, engineers, they use their own.

They buy from each other and build up each other and by so doing, the entire community becomes wealthier.

In contrast, African-Americans are the poorest income group in America because they do not support their own. They spend 98 per cent of their income in white-owned business making the white folks richer while they continue to struggle to put food on the table.

In T&T, we who comprise the 99 per cent, operate like the African-Americans. We make no concerted effort to create wealth within own communities.

This why I say that instead of being castigated Mr Mario Sabga-Aboud should be praised for opening our eyes.

His comments ought to spur us to take corrective action so that we can finally begin to enjoy a larger slice of the pie.

He has let the genie out of the bottle and it is up to us to make damn certain that it does not go back in.

Unlike Mr Roget, I am against the call for a boycott of businesses owned by any group in the society.

The so-called 1% did not wake up one morning and amass their wealth. We twiddled our thumbs and allowed them to do so and it is we and we alone who have to power to change that.

I am therefore calling for all members of the 99 per cent community to join hands to support ninety nine per cent-owned businesses and services.

I am in no way calling for anyone to be anti-one per cent but for all of us to be pro-ninety nine per cent.

If we don’t seize this opportunity, we will continue to struggle economically and for this, we will have only ourselves to blame.

 

J Johnson